Web Services Training Classes in Hartford, Connecticut

Learn Web Services in Hartford, Connecticut and surrounding areas via our hands-on, expert led courses. All of our classes either are offered on an onsite, online or public instructor led basis. Here is a list of our current Web Services related training offerings in Hartford, Connecticut: Web Services Training

We offer private customized training for groups of 3 or more attendees.

Course Directory [training on all levels]

Upcoming Classes
Gain insight and ideas from students with different perspectives and experiences.

Blog Entries publications that: entertain, make you think, offer insight

Back in the late 90's, there were a number of computer scienctists claiming to know java in hopes of landing a job for $80k+/year.  In fact, I know a woman you did just that:  land a project management position with a large telecom and have no experience whatsoever.  I guess the company figured that some talent was better than no talent and that, with some time and training, she would be productive.  Like all gravey train stories, that one, too, had an end.  After only a year, she was given a pink slip.

Not only are those days over, job prospects for the IT professional have become considerably more demanding.  Saying you know java today is like saying you know that you have expertise with the computer mouse; that's nice, but what else can you do.   This demand can be attributed to an increase in global competition along with the introduction of a number of varied technologies.   Take .NET, Python, Ruby, Spring, Hibernate ... as an example;  most of them, along with many others, are the backbone of the IT infrastructure of most mid-to-large scale US corporations.  Imagine the difficulty in finding the right mix of experience, knowledge and talent to support, maintain and devlop with such desparate technologies.

Well imagine no more.  According to the IT Hiring Index and Skills Report, seventy percent of CIO’s said it's challenging to find skilled professionals today.  If we add the rapid rate of technological innovation into the mix of factors affecting more businesses now than ever before, it’s understandable that the skill gap is widening.  Consider this as well:  the economic downturn has forced many potential retires to remain in the workforce.  This is detailed in MetLife's annual Study of Employee Benefits which states that“more than one-third of surveyed Baby Boomers (35%) say that as a result of economic conditions they plan to postpone their retirement.”  How then does the corporation hire new, more informed/better educated talent?    Indeed, the IT skills gap is ever widening.

In order to compensate for these skill discrepencies, many firms have resorted to hire the ideal candidates by demanding they possess a christmas wish list of expertise in a variety of different IT disciplines.  It would not be uncommon that such individuals have a strong programming background and are brilliant DBA's.  What about training?  That is certainly a way to diminish the skills gap.

As someone who works in many facets of the music industry, I used to seethe with a mixture of anger and jealousy when I would hear people in more “traditional” goods-based industries argue in favor of music content-based piracy. They made all the classic talking points, like “I wouldn’t spend money on this artist normally, and maybe if I like it I’ll spend money on them when they come to town” (which never happened), or “artists are rich and I’m poor, they don’t need my money” (rarely the case), or the worst, “if it were fairly priced and worth paying for, I’d buy it” (not true).  I always wondered if they’d have the same attitude if 63% of the things acquired by customers in their industries weren’t actually paid for, as was conservatively estimated as the case for the music industry in 2009 (other estimations put the figure of pirated music at 95%). Well, we may soon see the answer to curiosities like that. Though one can say with tentative confidence that music piracy is on the decline thanks to services like Spotify and Rdio, it could be looming on the horizon for the entire global, physical supply chain. Yes, I’m talking about 3d printers.

Before I get into the heart of this article, let me take a moment to make one thing clear: I think these machines are incredible. It’s damn near inspiring to think of even a few of their potentially world-changing applications: affordable, perfectly fit prosthetic limbs for wounded servicemen and women; the ability to create a piece of machinery on the spot instead of having to wait for a spare to arrive in the mail, or en route if your car or ship breaks down in a far away place; a company based out of Austin, TX even made a fully functioning firearm from a 3d printer a few months ago.

If these machines become as consumer-friendly and idiot-proof as possible (like computers), it’s possible that in a matter of decades (maybe less), a majority of U.S. households will have their own 3d printer. There’s also the possibility they could take the tech-hobbyist path, one that is much less appealing to the masses. Dale Dougherty of Makezine.com estimates there are currently around 100,000 “personal” 3d printers, or those not owned for business or educational purposes. I don’t think they’ll ever be as ubiquitous as computers, but there are plenty of mechanically inclined, crafty hobbyists out there who would love to play around with a 3d printer if it was affordable enough.

That being said, is there reason to worry about the economic implications of consumers making what they want, essentially for free, instead of paying someone else to produce it? Or will the printers instead be used for unique items more so than replicating and ripping off other companies’ merchandise in mass amounts? The number of people working in industries that would be affected by a development like this is far greater than the number of people who work in content-based industries, so any downturn would probably have a much larger economic implications. Certainly, those times are a ways off, but a little foresightedness never hurt anyone!

As part of our Java Tutorial series, listed here are all the files you need in order to create a java socket message application.

  1. Java Server Tutorial
  2. Java Client Tutorial
  3. readme - Java Socket Messaging Information
  4. Java Socket Tutorial Download

Since its foundation, HSG has been a leader in Business Rule Management Systems Training and Consulting services by way of the Blaze Advisor Rule Engine.  Over the years we have provided such services to many of the worlds largest corporations and government institutions whose respective backgrounds include credit card processing, banking, insurance, health and medicine and more, much more.  Such training and consulting services have included:

Create a wrapper object model in either Java, .NET or XML

Identify and catalog business rules

Develop a rule architecture within Blaze Advisor that isolates rule repositories as they relate to functionality and corporate policies

Configure, develop and implement a variety of interfaces to the rule engine from disparate systems ranging from mainframe applications written in Cobol to UNIX/Windows applications using Enterprise Java Beans, Windows Services, Web Services, Fat Clients, Java Messaging Services and Web Applications.

Review and update code to boost efficiency either by way of

    Removing functions calls within conditional statements

    Ensuring that database calls are essential or can be rearchitected in some other manner

    Employing the rete algorithm where necessary

    Paring down extensively large class models

    Deploying such appliations in multi-threaded systems

·         ...

Call us if you:

    are in need of Blaze Advisor Expertise
    are developing SMEs in Blaze
    want to speak directly with an expert (no placement agencies)
    want an affordable alternative to FICO
    want to work with an industry leader

Tech Life in Connecticut

Software developers in Hartford, Fairfield, New Haven, Greenwich and New Britain are rich in Fortune 1000 companies such as the Xerox Corporation, CIGNA, Aetna, and United Technologies Corporation just to name a few. A fun fact: Hartford has the oldest U.S. newspaper still being published?the Hartford Courant, established 1764. Connecticut is also the insurance capital of the nation.
The funny thing is, if you give two programmers the same problem-- it depends on the problem, but problems of a more mathematical nature, they can often end up writing the same code... Are we creating these things or are we just pulling the cobwebs off? Joe Armstrong - From the book: Coders at Work.
other Learning Options
Software developers near Hartford have ample opportunities to meet like minded techie individuals, collaborate and expend their career choices by participating in Meet-Up Groups. The following is a list of Technology Groups in the area.
Fortune 500 and 1000 companies in Connecticut that offer opportunities for Web Services developers
Company Name City Industry Secondary Industry
Stanley Black and Decker, Inc. New Britain Manufacturing Tools, Hardware and Light Machinery
EMCOR Group, Inc. Norwalk Energy and Utilities Energy and Utilities Other
The Hartford Financial Services Group Inc. Hartford Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
Crane Co. Stamford Manufacturing Tools, Hardware and Light Machinery
Cenveo. Inc. Stamford Business Services Business Services Other
Amphenol Corporation Wallingford Computers and Electronics Semiconductor and Microchip Manufacturing
W. R. Berkley Corporation Greenwich Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
Silgan Holdings Inc. Stamford Manufacturing Manufacturing Other
Hubbell Incorporated Shelton Manufacturing Concrete, Glass, and Building Materials
IMS Health Incorporated Danbury Business Services Management Consulting
CIGNA Corporation Hartford Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
Chemtura Corp. Middlebury Manufacturing Chemicals and Petrochemicals
Harman International Industries, Inc Stamford Computers and Electronics Audio, Video and Photography
United Rentals, Inc. Greenwich Real Estate and Construction Construction Equipment and Supplies
The Phoenix Companies, Inc. Hartford Financial Services Investment Banking and Venture Capital
Magellan Health Services, Inc. Avon Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals and Biotech Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals, and Biotech Other
Terex Corporation Westport Manufacturing Heavy Machinery
Praxair, Inc. Danbury Manufacturing Chemicals and Petrochemicals
Knights of Columbus New Haven Non-Profit Social and Membership Organizations
Xerox Corporation Norwalk Computers and Electronics Office Machinery and Equipment
Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide, Inc. Stamford Travel, Recreation and Leisure Hotels, Motels and Lodging
United Technologies Corporation Hartford Manufacturing Aerospace and Defense
General Electric Company Fairfield Computers and Electronics Consumer Electronics, Parts and Repair
Pitney Bowes, Inc. Stamford Manufacturing Tools, Hardware and Light Machinery
Charter Communications, Inc. Stamford Telecommunications Cable Television Providers
Aetna Inc. Hartford Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
Priceline.com Norwalk Travel, Recreation and Leisure Travel, Recreation, and Leisure Other

training details locations, tags and why hsg

A successful career as a software developer or other IT professional requires a solid understanding of software development processes, design patterns, enterprise application architectures, web services, security, networking and much more. The progression from novice to expert can be a daunting endeavor; this is especially true when traversing the learning curve without expert guidance. A common experience is that too much time and money is wasted on a career plan or application due to misinformation.

The Hartmann Software Group understands these issues and addresses them and others during any training engagement. Although no IT educational institution can guarantee career or application development success, HSG can get you closer to your goals at a far faster rate than self paced learning and, arguably, than the competition. Here are the reasons why we are so successful at teaching:

  • Learn from the experts.
    1. We have provided software development and other IT related training to many major corporations in Connecticut since 2002.
    2. Our educators have years of consulting and training experience; moreover, we require each trainer to have cross-discipline expertise i.e. be Java and .NET experts so that you get a broad understanding of how industry wide experts work and think.
  • Discover tips and tricks about Web Services programming
  • Get your questions answered by easy to follow, organized Web Services experts
  • Get up to speed with vital Web Services programming tools
  • Save on travel expenses by learning right from your desk or home office. Enroll in an online instructor led class. Nearly all of our classes are offered in this way.
  • Prepare to hit the ground running for a new job or a new position
  • See the big picture and have the instructor fill in the gaps
  • We teach with sophisticated learning tools and provide excellent supporting course material
  • Books and course material are provided in advance
  • Get a book of your choice from the HSG Store as a gift from us when you register for a class
  • Gain a lot of practical skills in a short amount of time
  • We teach what we know…software
  • We care…
learn more
page tags
what brought you to visit us
Hartford, Connecticut Web Services Training , Hartford, Connecticut Web Services Training Classes, Hartford, Connecticut Web Services Training Courses, Hartford, Connecticut Web Services Training Course, Hartford, Connecticut Web Services Training Seminar
training locations
Connecticut cities where we offer Web Services Training Classes

Interesting Reads Take a class with us and receive a book of your choosing for 50% off MSRP.