Oracle, MySQL, Cassandra, Hadoop Database Training Classes in Hartford, Connecticut

Learn Oracle, MySQL, Cassandra, Hadoop Database in Hartford, Connecticut and surrounding areas via our hands-on, expert led courses. All of our classes either are offered on an onsite, online or public instructor led basis. Here is a list of our current Oracle, MySQL, Cassandra, Hadoop Database related training offerings in Hartford, Connecticut: Oracle, MySQL, Cassandra, Hadoop Database Training

We offer private customized training for groups of 3 or more attendees.

Oracle, MySQL, Cassandra, Hadoop Database Training Catalog

cost: $ 495length: 1 day(s)
cost: $ 1190length: 3 day(s)
cost: $ 1090length: 3 day(s)
cost: $ 1190length: 3 day(s)
cost: $ 1090length: 2 day(s)

Cassandra Classes

Hadoop Classes

cost: $ 1590length: 3 day(s)

Linux Unix Classes

cost: $ 1890length: 3 day(s)

Microsoft Development Classes

MySQL Classes

cost: $ 490length: 1 day(s)
cost: $ 790length: 2 day(s)
cost: $ 1290length: 4 day(s)
cost: $ 1190length: 3 day(s)

Oracle Classes

cost: $ 2090length: 5 day(s)
cost: $ 1190length: 3 day(s)
cost: $ 2090length: 5 day(s)
cost: $ 2090length: 5 day(s)
cost: $ 2090length: 5 day(s)
cost: $ 2090length: 5 day(s)
cost: $ 1190length: 3 day(s)
cost: $ 2090length: 5 day(s)
cost: $ 1590length: 4 day(s)
cost: $ 790length: 2 day(s)
cost: $ 690length: 1 day(s)
cost: $ 2800length: 5 day(s)
cost: $ 1690length: 3 day(s)
cost: $ 2600length: 5 day(s)

SQL Server Classes

cost: $ 1290length: 3 day(s)
cost: $ 890length: 2 day(s)
cost: $ 2090length: 5 day(s)
cost: $ 2090length: 4 day(s)
cost: $ 2090length: 5 day(s)
cost: $ 2190length: 5 day(s)
cost: $ 1290length: 3 day(s)

Course Directory [training on all levels]

Upcoming Classes
Gain insight and ideas from students with different perspectives and experiences.

Blog Entries publications that: entertain, make you think, offer insight

IT Outsourcing Outsourcing IT needs in the corporate world has become extremely popular because it is cost-efficient and it gives IT resources to companies that may not otherwise be able to afford them. Another positive side effect of IT outsourcing is that it has brought many technology jobs back to the United States.

As convenient and patriotic as IT outsourcing has become, it also have several limitations that have caused many companies to re-think the idea of funding their own internal IT group. It is important for a company to be completely familiar with these limitations before developing any kind of company policy in regards to IT.

The Customer Could Outgrow The Outsource Company

When an IT outsourcing company first takes on a new client, the relationship is beneficial to both sides. But things can start to get inconvenient for the client when the client's business starts to outgrow the capabilities of the IT outsource group.

An IT outsourcing company can become entrenched in the daily routine of its clients, which is great at first. But when the IT company can no longer keep pace with the growth of its clients, then the clients are stuck trying to find a new solution and keep track of its own IT assets at the same time.

The IT Outsourcing Company Lacks The Necessary Technical Expertise

IT outsourcing clients like to believe that their support company knows everything there is to know about computers and the Internet. But every IT support company has its areas of expertise and they have the technical areas where they are not quite as strong. If the client starts to experience needs from the areas where the IT outsourcing company is not so strong, then that can become a significant business issue.

This problem can be amplified if the client is a small business experiencing growth. An IT outsourcing company is not as likely to bring on new personnel for a smaller client, which leaves the client without a solution.

The Client Losses A Measure Of Control Over Its Data

No matter how large or successful an IT outsourcing company may be, there will always be the limitation of client security and the protection of critical customer data. All it takes is one rogue employee of the IT outsourcing company to compromise all of the client's critical data.

Some IT outsourcing companies have safeguards put in place to try and prevent client data compromise, but those safeguards are limited by how much access the IT company has to the client network. In most cases, that access has to be comprehensive for the IT outsourcing company to be able to do its job.

Outsourcing IT responsibilities can take a lot of stress off of a client and allow that client to operate his business by focusing on his core competencies. But there are limitations to IT outsourcing that could make it necessary for a client to do his own IT support and pay the extra costs.

I’ll get straight to the point.  Why should companies invest more in management training?  Here are 10 simple reasons.

1) An employee’s relationship with his or her direct manager is the most important single factor in employee engagement.

2) Engaged employees are happier and more productive.  Disengaged employees are frustrated and more disruptive.

3) Because there’s no widely agreed-on skillset for management (good managers come in all shapes and sizes), there’s an assumption everyone knows how to do it.  This is akin to someone who’s never driven before being given keys to a car and told: “Drive.”  (Many many years ago, this is how I first learned to manage.  I blundered my way through it.  Trial and error.  It wasn’t pretty.)

Another blanket article about the pros and cons of Direct to Consumer (D2C) isn’t needed, I know. By now, we all know the rules for how this model enters a market: its disruption fights any given sector’s established sales model, a fuzzy compromise is temporarily met, and the lean innovator always wins out in the end.

That’s exactly how it played out in the music industry when Apple and record companies created a digital storefront in iTunes to usher music sales into the online era. What now appears to have been a stopgap compromise, iTunes was the standard model for 5-6 years until consumers realized there was no point in purchasing and owning digital media when internet speeds increased and they could listen to it for free through a music streaming service.  In 2013, streaming models are the new music consumption standard. Netflix is nearly parallel in the film and TV world, though they’ve done a better job keeping it all under one roof. Apple mastered retail sales so well that the majority of Apple products, when bought in-person, are bought at an Apple store. That’s even more impressive when you consider how few Apple stores there are in the U.S. (253) compared to big box electronics stores that sell Apple products like Best Buy (1,100) Yet while some industries have implemented a D2C approach to great success, others haven’t even dipped a toe in the D2C pool, most notably the auto industry.

What got me thinking about this topic is the recent flurry of attention Tesla Motors has received for its D2C model. It all came to a head at the beginning of July when a petition on whitehouse.gov to allow Tesla to sell directly to consumers in all 50 states reached the 100,000 signatures required for administration comment. As you might imagine, many powerful car dealership owners armed with lobbyists have made a big stink about Elon Musk, Tesla’s CEO and Product Architect, choosing to sidestep the traditional supply chain and instead opting to sell directly to their customers through their website. These dealership owners say that they’re against the idea because they want to protect consumers, but the real motive is that they want to defend their right to exist (and who wouldn’t?). They essentially have a monopoly at their position in the sales process, and they want to keep it that way. More frightening for the dealerships is the possibility that once Tesla starts selling directly to consumers, so will the big three automakers, and they fear that would be the end of the road for their business. Interestingly enough, the big three flirted with the idea of D2C in the early 90’s before they were met with fierce backlash from dealerships. I’m sure the dealership community has no interest in mounting a fight like that again. 

To say that the laws preventing Tesla from selling online are peripherally relevant would be a compliment. By and large, the laws the dealerships point to fall under the umbrella of “Franchise Laws” that were put in place at the dawn of car sales to protect franchisees against manufacturers opening their own stores and undercutting the franchise that had invested so much to sell the manufacturer’s cars.  There’s certainly a need for those laws to exist, because no owner of a dealership selling Jeeps wants Chrysler to open their own dealership next door and sell them for substantially less. However, because Tesla is independently owned and isn’t currently selling their cars through any third party dealership, this law doesn’t really apply to them. Until their cars are sold through independent dealerships, they’re incapable of undercutting anyone by implementing D2C structure.

Attempting to create an intelligent entry about Linux for such a wide ranging audience is a bit like trying to compare a presentation on quantum mechanics for physicists while being readable by somebody with a junior high school education.

If you are a *NIX expert, then I suggest you keep on reading so you know how to explain this world to mere mortals.

I called it *nix for a reason. It represents a family of thinking. It is not unlike the difference between the language C and C++. Are there differences between the two? Certainly. And it is not like the difference between COBOL and C.

Years ago when I ran my own vo-tech school I would teach the students there are only two things in life. MS and *NIX. A friend of mine, a genius developer in her own right was aghast.

Tech Life in Connecticut

Software developers in Hartford, Fairfield, New Haven, Greenwich and New Britain are rich in Fortune 1000 companies such as the Xerox Corporation, CIGNA, Aetna, and United Technologies Corporation just to name a few. A fun fact: Hartford has the oldest U.S. newspaper still being published?the Hartford Courant, established 1764. Connecticut is also the insurance capital of the nation.
All the world is a laboratory to the inquiring mind.  ~Martin H. Fischer
other Learning Options
Software developers near Hartford have ample opportunities to meet like minded techie individuals, collaborate and expend their career choices by participating in Meet-Up Groups. The following is a list of Technology Groups in the area.
Fortune 500 and 1000 companies in Connecticut that offer opportunities for Oracle, MySQL, Cassandra, Hadoop Database developers
Company Name City Industry Secondary Industry
Stanley Black and Decker, Inc. New Britain Manufacturing Tools, Hardware and Light Machinery
EMCOR Group, Inc. Norwalk Energy and Utilities Energy and Utilities Other
The Hartford Financial Services Group Inc. Hartford Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
Crane Co. Stamford Manufacturing Tools, Hardware and Light Machinery
Cenveo. Inc. Stamford Business Services Business Services Other
Amphenol Corporation Wallingford Computers and Electronics Semiconductor and Microchip Manufacturing
W. R. Berkley Corporation Greenwich Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
Silgan Holdings Inc. Stamford Manufacturing Manufacturing Other
Hubbell Incorporated Shelton Manufacturing Concrete, Glass, and Building Materials
IMS Health Incorporated Danbury Business Services Management Consulting
CIGNA Corporation Hartford Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
Chemtura Corp. Middlebury Manufacturing Chemicals and Petrochemicals
Harman International Industries, Inc Stamford Computers and Electronics Audio, Video and Photography
United Rentals, Inc. Greenwich Real Estate and Construction Construction Equipment and Supplies
The Phoenix Companies, Inc. Hartford Financial Services Investment Banking and Venture Capital
Magellan Health Services, Inc. Avon Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals and Biotech Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals, and Biotech Other
Terex Corporation Westport Manufacturing Heavy Machinery
Praxair, Inc. Danbury Manufacturing Chemicals and Petrochemicals
Knights of Columbus New Haven Non-Profit Social and Membership Organizations
Xerox Corporation Norwalk Computers and Electronics Office Machinery and Equipment
Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide, Inc. Stamford Travel, Recreation and Leisure Hotels, Motels and Lodging
United Technologies Corporation Hartford Manufacturing Aerospace and Defense
General Electric Company Fairfield Computers and Electronics Consumer Electronics, Parts and Repair
Pitney Bowes, Inc. Stamford Manufacturing Tools, Hardware and Light Machinery
Charter Communications, Inc. Stamford Telecommunications Cable Television Providers
Aetna Inc. Hartford Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
Priceline.com Norwalk Travel, Recreation and Leisure Travel, Recreation, and Leisure Other

training details locations, tags and why hsg

A successful career as a software developer or other IT professional requires a solid understanding of software development processes, design patterns, enterprise application architectures, web services, security, networking and much more. The progression from novice to expert can be a daunting endeavor; this is especially true when traversing the learning curve without expert guidance. A common experience is that too much time and money is wasted on a career plan or application due to misinformation.

The Hartmann Software Group understands these issues and addresses them and others during any training engagement. Although no IT educational institution can guarantee career or application development success, HSG can get you closer to your goals at a far faster rate than self paced learning and, arguably, than the competition. Here are the reasons why we are so successful at teaching:

  • Learn from the experts.
    1. We have provided software development and other IT related training to many major corporations in Connecticut since 2002.
    2. Our educators have years of consulting and training experience; moreover, we require each trainer to have cross-discipline expertise i.e. be Java and .NET experts so that you get a broad understanding of how industry wide experts work and think.
  • Discover tips and tricks about Oracle, MySQL, Cassandra, Hadoop Database programming
  • Get your questions answered by easy to follow, organized Oracle, MySQL, Cassandra, Hadoop Database experts
  • Get up to speed with vital Oracle, MySQL, Cassandra, Hadoop Database programming tools
  • Save on travel expenses by learning right from your desk or home office. Enroll in an online instructor led class. Nearly all of our classes are offered in this way.
  • Prepare to hit the ground running for a new job or a new position
  • See the big picture and have the instructor fill in the gaps
  • We teach with sophisticated learning tools and provide excellent supporting course material
  • Books and course material are provided in advance
  • Get a book of your choice from the HSG Store as a gift from us when you register for a class
  • Gain a lot of practical skills in a short amount of time
  • We teach what we know…software
  • We care…
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